Somebody Come Save This Sunshine

My head is filled with things to say...

193 notes

peoplecartographer:

time-for-maps:

Japanese map of the world, 1708. [1512 × 676]

This is the first time I have ever reblogged a map. (Weird, right???) More than any of the other maps I have seen on my dashboard, this one captured my imagination. As I have written before, I adore antique maps; at over 300 years old, this one easily falls in that category. The vast majority of the antique maps that I have been exposed to are European, so the fact that this was created in Asia really intrigues me. The first point I wish to make about this map is that Japan is seen in the center and is crossed by what appears to be a sort of prime meridian. (The prime meridian on most modern maps passes through England.) Furthermore, the islands that comprise Japan are much larger in this map than in more modern maps produced by the West. This placement and size of Japan suggest that the cartographers had a very Japan-centered worldview, in the same way that European mapmakers were Eurocentric. This is valuable because in recent years there has been a great deal of criticism of maps that place Europe or the United States in the center. Although such maps seem to suggest that the West is (unfairly) dominant over the rest of the world, I believe that they are merely evidence of people’s tendency to assign a disproportionate amount of importance to their home/nation. This Japanese world map is evidence of such a tendency. Another fascinating feature of the map is that countries are generally separated by water; this creates the appearance of a world entirely composed of islands. Since Japan itself is solely made up of islands, it is apparent that the Japanese cartographers did not comprehend and/or accept that the rest of the world did not follow the same pattern. This map is therefore a perfect reminder of the importance of maps in understanding the mindsets and worldviews of the people who created them and of the societies in which they arose.

peoplecartographer:

time-for-maps:

Japanese map of the world, 1708. [1512 × 676]

This is the first time I have ever reblogged a map. (Weird, right???) More than any of the other maps I have seen on my dashboard, this one captured my imagination. As I have written before, I adore antique maps; at over 300 years old, this one easily falls in that category. The vast majority of the antique maps that I have been exposed to are European, so the fact that this was created in Asia really intrigues me. The first point I wish to make about this map is that Japan is seen in the center and is crossed by what appears to be a sort of prime meridian. (The prime meridian on most modern maps passes through England.) Furthermore, the islands that comprise Japan are much larger in this map than in more modern maps produced by the West. This placement and size of Japan suggest that the cartographers had a very Japan-centered worldview, in the same way that European mapmakers were Eurocentric. This is valuable because in recent years there has been a great deal of criticism of maps that place Europe or the United States in the center. Although such maps seem to suggest that the West is (unfairly) dominant over the rest of the world, I believe that they are merely evidence of people’s tendency to assign a disproportionate amount of importance to their home/nation. This Japanese world map is evidence of such a tendency. Another fascinating feature of the map is that countries are generally separated by water; this creates the appearance of a world entirely composed of islands. Since Japan itself is solely made up of islands, it is apparent that the Japanese cartographers did not comprehend and/or accept that the rest of the world did not follow the same pattern. This map is therefore a perfect reminder of the importance of maps in understanding the mindsets and worldviews of the people who created them and of the societies in which they arose.

(via weinerchesters)

1,433,629 notes

Reblog or your mom will die in 928 seconds.

stardusttx:

twirliest:

steampoweredplayer:

lollie-pond:

larryismyhallelujah:

thetasrose:

peachy-blisss:

myswagisnice:

I love my mom.

image

I am risking nothing

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I AM SORRY FOLLOWERS, I LOVE MY MOMMY

Will not risk.

image

sorry followers :(

omg im so glad to se so many people love their mummy

Why’re you being mean to my mum?

goddamn it

Nope. Googled it. 15 minuets. Nope. Not taking any chances

Koop

This has 1.2 million reblogs …
Ps not riskin it

1.4 almost
ps not risking it

(via themagicrose)

1 note

oh my god so yesterday was my last day of work

and this old guy came through my line and I said the usual “how are you”

and he responded with “well, i’m alive. sadly.”

he sounded so defeated, the poor guy. i almost wish i was still working so i could try to cheer him up.